Cultivating Ourselves with the Seasons:

Our True Biorhythm as Seen Through The 5 Elements of Nature

By Dustin Siena, L.Ac.

 

                                As the sun rises in the east, and illuminates our world, we are reminded it is time to begin another glorious day. As our pupils come into contact with the bright light from above, they constrict, and our bodies begin a complex series of biochemical, hormonal, and primal reactions that catapult us out of our sleepy slumber. Activity shall begin, and upon waking, we enter into a world of work, chores, errands, responsibilities, and things that we associate with the “day.”

 

                   Our intuitive reaction to day and night, is an illustration of our connection to the polarity of yin and yang. While the dichotomy of yin and yang may sound quite simplistic, there are so many combinations of yin and yang, that the “I Ching” contains 64 hexagrams, which are configurations of combinations of yin and yang. Two opposing energies. Yin nourishes and provides substance and support for yang. Yang protects, transforms, warms, moves, and inspires. Yin descends, consolidates, while Yang ascends and expands. They are relative to each other in their function. And even though day is yang in nature, and yin is more night, within a twenty-four period, there are actually four different combinations of yin & yang, that define each six hour period during the day. And while there are four seasons during the year, they are also four different combinations of yin and yang that define each season.

 

                   If we can have a sense of how the seasons differ in their nature, we can have a deeper understanding of ourselves, and the behavior, feelings, challenges, desires, and fears that we may face during a given season.

 

                   In Chinese Medicine, the season will dictate the individuals pulse. The pulse, being an encyclopedia of information about a person’s life, can reveal information not only in terms of internal organs hypofunction or hyperfunction, but rather, a detailed energetic configuration of the interplay of yin and yang energy, within a person mind and soul. This pulse will have a model from which to follow, based on the season. Therefore, the season must be regarded as one of the primary etiological factors in diagnosing any sort of imbalance in an individual. 

 

                   One cannot separate the individual from the season in which they dwell. While Western Medicine providers may view the season as a medically irrelevant backdrop to the patient they are treating, in Chinese Medicine, the season alone provides the Chinese Doctor with a cornucopia of energetic clues which can help facilitate and unlock both a diagnosis and a treatment for the patient.

 

By Dustin Siena, L.Ac.

Copyright Dustin Siena 2009

 

 

Here's a quick & easy 5-Element Chart for your Reference:     

 

Five Elements

Wood

Fire

Earth

Metal

Water

Environment

Wind

Heat

Damp

Dry

Cold

Seasons

Spring

Summer

Late Summer

Autumn

Winter

Zang

Liver

Heart

Spleen

Lung

Kidney

Fu

Gallbladder

Small Intestine

Stomach

Large Intestine

Bladder

Directions

East

South

Middle

West

North

Tastes

Sour

Bitter

Sweet

Pungent

Salty

Sense Organs

Eye

Tongue

Mouth

Nose

Ear

Tissues

Tendons/Sinews

Vessel

Muscle

Skin and Hair

Bone

*Emotions

Anger / Assertiveness

Mania / Joy

Worry /

 Meditation  

Grief /

Order & Structure

Fear / Will

Sounds

Shouting

Laughing

Singing

Crying

Groaning

Smell

Rancid

Burned

Sweetish

Rank

Putrid

 

 

* In the emotion section, the 1st emotion represents an imbalance in that element, while the 2nd may represent the pure manifestation of radiant health of that element. (Example:  Wood: Anger is considered pathological, while assertiveness is a virtue.)

 

**The 2nd emotion listed in each section are not from any traditional sources, rather, I have extrapolated the healthy emotions that I believe may be associated with each element.